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Albums

Din of Ecstasy Media


pyscho-sexual

 

Listen to a live version of “Liberation or Death”

 

 

Some of Chris’s Thoughts re Din

“There must be a darkness under the surface.  People have this idyllic, drug-like dream of a romantic life … a perfect relationship or mythologising someone on the cover of a magazine, all the things that look picturesque but are really very destructive. …. Everybody deals with alienation, but those people who keep it under wraps are just too boring to deal with. …. This is a very personal record about breaking up with my wife and having an identity crisis.  A lot of it is raw, naked, and kind of psycho-sexual.  There are lots of drugs and compulsions that I’m getting at.  There’s a lot of creative stff in neurotic indulgence. …. In New York, you’re exposed to a lot of human shit, but there is also beauty in almost any situation.” [Bloody Valentines, Mojo, April 1995]

“From a musical vantage point, [Din of Ecstasy] was me going back to my roots. I felt Living with the Law didn’t have an edge that I always felt. With Din of Ecstasy, I went back to my teenage thinking of louder, aggressive and visceral. It was a power trio album. I was trying to articulate some edginess I grew up with like Led Zeppelin, Hendrix, Cream, and The Doors. Also, I was breaking up with my wife of 13 years and dealing with my own morality issues. I realized that maybe a lightning bolt wouldn’t strike me if I split up with her. I was also madly in love with someone else at the time. I was asking myself a lot of questions like “What is my dogma about relationships? Why do people stay together when they’re not happy? Why is it called love when it’s a need? Why is it called sexual fulfillment when it’s just fucking?” That’s where the content for the album came from. It was a social response to a personal, intimate thing. I was trying to articulate all of that stuff, but I think I lost some people with that album because it wasn’t just a guy screaming out loud. The sound of the record itself resonated more with people than the impetus that motivated the writing. That might have resulted from my own musical indulgences.” [Melancholic Resonance, from Anil Prasad’s Innerviews]

Whitley calls many of his songs “male and female.” He cites “Can’t Get Off,” which twitches and squirms with frustration, as an example. “When I think about it lyrically, it feels like a guy being a guy, but being really stupidly vulnerable,” he said. “It almost seems like the lyrics are like the masculine and the music is like the feminine, in terms of feel.”  “Narcotic Prayer” is “about expecting something from a relationship, on any level, that it can’t give you,” he said. “You can only get it yourself, and it’s the most lonely thing you finally come upon at some point. I’ve done it so many times in different relationships, and I do it now.” Musically, Whitley’s songs are slippery. He likes odd chords and syncopated rhythms. He describes some songs as lazily shuffling along, but having a tension that pushes them forward, a “lilt,” as he calls it. He says it comes from playing solo on the street. “I just am rhythmic more than anything,” he said. “I emulated stuff on guitar; I became quite rhythmic just pragmatically.  [“Contradiction Important to Chris Whitley”]

 

Articles

The Jagged Edge : Chris Whitley’s raw, ever-changing style defies categories. On his new album, ‘Din of Ecstasy,’ the reluctant bluesman dives into recent inner struggles.

Live Shots: Chris Whitley, Antone’s July 6, 1995

Chris Whitley: Upbeat and in Your Face at Dragonfly

Troubled Songs in a Voice That Groans and Aches: Chris Whitley Brownie’s

Chris Whitley Rewarding Those Who Can Follow His Wanderings

Chris Whitley – Overdriven Hymns from Nowhere

Chris Whitley – Lost in Shadows and Fog

Chris Whitley Performs His Own Style of Blues in Philadelphia

Chris Whitley Reveals a Darker Shade of Blues

Chris Whitley’s Shift Reflects His Concept of the Blues

Chris Whitley’s Twisted Blues

Contradiction Important to Chris Whitley

Din Man: Chris Whitley Finds His Musical Heart

Din Promo Materials from Sony

Guitarist Performs More Agony than Ecstasy

Chris Whitley Exchanges Melodies for Blustery Sounds (Khyber Pass Gig Review)

Painting the Town Blue (Time Mag – excerpt)

Restless Troubadour of Passion, Pain

The Art of Noise: Chris Whitley Fumbles toward Ecstasy

The New Chris Whitley Plays Harder than Ever

Underlying Whitley’s `Din’ Are Some Serious Blues

Whitley Resists Categories in Creating Music

Whitley Welcomes Change (Antone’s 1993 preview to Din)

Whitley’s “Ecstasy” Makes a Bluesy Din

Whitley’s NY Seedy Blues

Bootlegs and Other Audio

Live Music Archive

Paste Magazine Audio of Several Din Shows

Danny Kadar’s Original Mix of Din (different order + never released song)

Danny Kadar’s Demo – Guns and Dolls

Danny Kadar’s New Machine/Poison Girl – Live

Videos

Khyber Pass Din Show 1995-06-27

Sony Studios – Recording New Machine

LWA and New Machine on House of Blues

Din on Jon Stewart

O God My Heart Is Ready Now (Official)

Photos

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